IntelligentDesign/RandomDrift

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Andy Gardner; andyggardner@gmail.com, aggardner@rhodes.edu; husband / evolutionary biologist / teacher / espresso-obsessive / car nut / etc.
likeafieldmouse:

Paul Klee - Architecture of the Plain (1923)

likeafieldmouse:

Paul Klee - Architecture of the Plain (1923)

(via moonmoth)

— 6 days ago with 1676 notes
#klee  #art  #quilt? 

infinity-imagined:

A hypothesized mechanism for the origin of life, an event called abiogenesis.  In this version, called RNA world, small molecules called nucleotides formed in the waters of the early Earth during the Hadean Eon, and polymerized on the surface of clay minerals.  These simple chains of RNA could replicate themselves in solution, but only slowly and inaccurately.  An RNA molecule developed which would fold into a structure that catalyzed RNA polymerization; a ribozyme.  The first ribozymes would replicate their sister strands, and produce copies of themselves and other RNA molecules. 

     In the same environment, long chains of carbon molecules called phospholipids were formed.  These molecules have two parts, the tail, which is hydrophobic, and the head, which is hydrophillic.  Because of these properties phospholipids will stick together and form micelles and vesicles in water.  Vesicles can absorb RNA nucleotides, concentrating them and creating a space where they can replicate, mutate and evolve.  At some point a ribozyme became enclosed within a vesicle, starting a chain reaction that evolved into the multitude of biological forms that we see today.

   Because this event occurred more than 3.8 billion years ago, theories about how and where it happened are highly speculative.  Possible environments for abiogensis include hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, hyper saline bubbles of water trapped in ice, radioactive lakes or lagoons on earths surface, and even in space or on another planet, brought to earth through a panspermia event.  We have very little molecular evidence of the first cells, but ribozymes and catalytic RNA molecules are embedded in the DNA replication machinery of all life.  Because evidence of this event has almost certainly been lost to time, the true mechanisms of the origin of life may remain a mystery to science.

(Source: exploringorigins.org, via mrcaptaincook)

— 1 week ago with 4091 notes
#abiogenesis  #evolution  #teaching  #science  #gif  #art  #DNA  #cell  #cell division  #professional 
Goodeniaceae Working Group Symposium Western Australian Herbarium, Perth Fourth of August, 2014. 

Goodeniaceae Working Group Symposium
Western Australian Herbarium, Perth
Fourth of August, 2014. 

— 1 week ago
#professional  #australia  #goodeniaceae  #friends 
Xanthorrhoea, grass tree, at Royal NP.

Xanthorrhoea, grass tree, at Royal NP.

— 1 week ago with 4 notes
#Xanthorrhoea  #grass tree  #australia  #photography  #plants 

Everlastings and a sheoak.

— 1 week ago with 1 note
#australia  #photography 
Western Australian Fringe lily, Thysanotus.

Western Australian Fringe lily, Thysanotus.

— 2 weeks ago with 2 notes
#thysanotus  #flower  #photography  #australia  #plants  #professional 
joerojasburke:

Is the coelacanth a ‘living fossil’? 
Definitely not if you think that means these fish have not evolved since the dinosaur days. 
These sketches show the huge variety of body shapes and sizes (in meters) that evolved among the coelacanths. Some had a short, round body, some had a long, slender body, some were eel-like, others resembled trout or even piranha, Casane and Laurenti point out. You can see how Latimeria, the lone surviving coelacanth lineage, attained double the body length of its closest relative, the extinct Macropoma, and also developed a very different body shape.
Source: Why coelacanths are not ‘living fossils’ A review of molecular and morphological data, by Didier Casane and Patrick Laurenti, Bioessays (2013)

joerojasburke:

Is the coelacanth a ‘living fossil’?

Definitely not if you think that means these fish have not evolved since the dinosaur days.

These sketches show the huge variety of body shapes and sizes (in meters) that evolved among the coelacanths. Some had a short, round body, some had a long, slender body, some were eel-like, others resembled trout or even piranha, Casane and Laurenti point out. You can see how Latimeria, the lone surviving coelacanth lineage, attained double the body length of its closest relative, the extinct Macropomaand also developed a very different body shape.

(via scientificillustration)

— 2 weeks ago with 541 notes
#coelacanth  #fossil  #teaching  #professional  #phylogeny  #evolution  #history 
libutron:

Night Blooming Cactus | ©National Museum Wales 
Cereus grandiflorus, from Plantae Selectae by G.D. Ehret, 1772.
Hand-colored engraving: 50cm x 34cm.
The composition of this study reflects Ehret’s talents as an accomplished designer and draughtsman. The result is both scientifically valuable with accurate dissections and aesthetically pleasing.
Currently this species is named Selenicereus grandiflorus (Caryophyllales - Cactaceae).

libutron:

Night Blooming Cactus | ©National Museum Wales 

Cereus grandiflorus, from Plantae Selectae by G.D. Ehret, 1772.

Hand-colored engraving: 50cm x 34cm.

The composition of this study reflects Ehret’s talents as an accomplished designer and draughtsman. The result is both scientifically valuable with accurate dissections and aesthetically pleasing.

Currently this species is named Selenicereus grandiflorus (Caryophyllales - Cactaceae).

(via scientificillustration)

— 2 weeks ago with 304 notes
#cereus  #cactus  #plants  #art