IntelligentDesign/RandomDrift

curriculum vitae   Goodeniaceae   Oxalis   teaching   cars   photography   Europe 2010   Brasil 2011   Mediterranean 2012   

Andy Gardner; andyggardner@gmail.com, aggardner@rhodes.edu; husband / evolutionary biologist / teacher / espresso-obsessive / car nut / etc.
Banksia ericifolia in Royal NP.

Banksia ericifolia in Royal NP.

— 3 days ago
#banksia  #photography  #australia 

Kunzea, Dampiera, Darwinia, and Lambertia in Royal National Park.

— 3 days ago
#Kunzea  #Dampiera  #Darwinia  #Lambertia  #plants  #australia  #photography 

Banksia, Isopogon, and Erythrina in Royal National Park, south of Sydney

— 3 days ago
#banksia  #isopogon  #erythrina  #plants  #photography  #australia 

1954 Triumph TR2 and a 1967 TR4A

— 4 weeks ago
#car  #triumph  #TR2  #TR4  #photography 
antediluvianechoes:

Hangenberg Event, Benjamin Chandler, 2013

The Devonian ends in pulses—waves of extinction—like ripples disturbing the surface of a glassy puddle. Life prospers and withers and prospers. It is a 25 million year-long antiphony. 

Between the dyings: flourishings, celebrations of corals and trilobites, ammonites and stromatoporoids. Some fish build armor and go to war, hiding in scaly hulls or crushing shell and bone with steam shovel jaws. Others play with new forms, gulp air and hoist themselves over muddy banks with fins-become-feet. 

Between the flourishings: dyings. The seas become poison, anoxic tides of suffocation drained by glaciers, clotted by vegetable matter, and shot with asteroids. From those brinks, life rebuilds, learns new forms and tricks—then dies in the next catastrophe. Extinction and rebirth, again and again, like a steady heartbeat through the epoch: lub-dub, lub-dub, life-death, life-death.

But the choruses break. The Devonian’s see-saw seasons of life and death close with an extinction so severe it takes 15 million years for life to recuperate. The era’s final dying is dressed in green. The irony: extinction comes, not from a lack of life, but too much of it. Blankets of choking verdant scum fill the epicontinental seas. Algae conquers the placoderms—just simple, unassuming cyanobacteria that devour every nutrient, consume every inch of living space, and pull a great, final, emerald curtain over the Age of Fishes, leaving a desolate blank in the fossil record to someday puzzle Alfred Romer.

antediluvianechoes:

Hangenberg Event, Benjamin Chandler, 2013

The Devonian ends in pulses—waves of extinction—like ripples disturbing the surface of a glassy puddle. Life prospers and withers and prospers. It is a 25 million year-long antiphony. 

Between the dyings: flourishings, celebrations of corals and trilobites, ammonites and stromatoporoids. Some fish build armor and go to war, hiding in scaly hulls or crushing shell and bone with steam shovel jaws. Others play with new forms, gulp air and hoist themselves over muddy banks with fins-become-feet. 

Between the flourishings: dyings. The seas become poison, anoxic tides of suffocation drained by glaciers, clotted by vegetable matter, and shot with asteroids. From those brinks, life rebuilds, learns new forms and tricks—then dies in the next catastrophe. Extinction and rebirth, again and again, like a steady heartbeat through the epoch: lub-dub, lub-dub, life-death, life-death.

But the choruses break. The Devonian’s see-saw seasons of life and death close with an extinction so severe it takes 15 million years for life to recuperate. The era’s final dying is dressed in green. The irony: extinction comes, not from a lack of life, but too much of it. Blankets of choking verdant scum fill the epicontinental seas. Algae conquers the placoderms—just simple, unassuming cyanobacteria that devour every nutrient, consume every inch of living space, and pull a great, final, emerald curtain over the Age of Fishes, leaving a desolate blank in the fossil record to someday puzzle Alfred Romer.

— 1 month ago with 128 notes
#teaching  #devonian  #professional  #art  #evolution  #placoderm 
phyto-porno:

Brunsvigia josephinæ
These massive bulbs are blooming their hearts out at University of California Berkeley Botanical Garden. Though evolved for pollination by sunbirds in South Africa, here in California hummingbirds have developed a taste for these splendid flowers.
© 2012 Jacob Uluwehi Knecht

phyto-porno:

Brunsvigia josephinæ

These massive bulbs are blooming their hearts out at University of California Berkeley Botanical Garden. Though evolved for pollination by sunbirds in South Africa, here in California hummingbirds have developed a taste for these splendid flowers.

© 2012 Jacob Uluwehi Knecht

— 1 month ago with 18 notes
#plants  #Brunsvigia  #bulb  #africa 
Early 80s Ray in the TR4.

Early 80s Ray in the TR4.

— 1 month ago
#family  #Ray  #triumph  #car 

Damask roses, Shopkeeper’s choice spice mix, and an assortment of sweets.

— 1 month ago with 8 notes
#morocco  #photography 
Mugging from the top of Aït Benhaddou.

Mugging from the top of Aït Benhaddou.

— 1 month ago
#sasha  #family  #morocco 
Barbary macaques in the middle Atlas

Barbary macaques in the middle Atlas

— 1 month ago with 1 note
#monkey  #photography  #Atlas  #morocco 
Brasswork detail on a royal door in Fes.

Brasswork detail on a royal door in Fes.

— 1 month ago with 1 note
#design  #photography  #FES  #morocco 

around Kasbah of the Udayas, Rabat.

— 1 month ago with 2 notes
#photography  #rabat  #morocco